Andrea Gauthier named finalist in SSHRC Storytellers challenge

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A big congratulations goes out to Andrea Gauthier, @MScBMC grad, PhD student and ScienceVis lab member. Andrea has been named a finalist in the SSHRC Storytellers competition. Andrea’s research examines the features of game design that may be leveraged to promote learning. As a finalist Andrea will be invited to attend the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in May and present her work. Congratulations Andrea!

 

European Conference on Game Based Learning

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A big congratulations goes out to Andrea Gauthier, who won top honors at the European Conference on Game Based Learning for her PhD paper titled Serious Game Facilitates Conceptual Change about Molecular Emergence Through Productive Negativity. Andrea is currently in her 4th year of PhD studies. Her research examines the potential of gameplay in remediating misconceptions relating to the study of complex emergent processes in undergraduate biology. Read Andrea’s paper here.

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2016 SciVis Retreat

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Science Visualization Retreat

May 17-18 marked the inaugural ScienceVis Lab retreat. We headed north for some much needed headspace and fresh air. Our agenda included a discussion of the potential advantages and pitfalls of animation and novel interactive technologies for supporting learning in life sciences, some ideas for future studies, and a primer on stargazing courtesy of Michael Corrin.

Andrea Gauthier wins Vanier Award

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Congratulations to Andrea Gauthier who is a 2015 recipient of a Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarship. Each year the Canadian Government awards up to 167 scholarships to doctoral students across Canada who demonstrate leadership skills and a high standard of scholarly achievement. This prestigious award is valued at 50,000 dollars each year for three years. Andrea, who is completing a PhD in the Institute of Medical Science, is one of 22 recipients at the University of Toronto. Her research examines the potential of game design in transforming and assessing undergraduates’ understanding of molecular emergence.

Screenshot of Level 2 gameplay in progress. The player has successfully encapsulated himself in a clathrin-coated vesicle to be transported across a membrane into Level 3.

Screenshot of Level 2 gameplay in progress. The player has successfully encapsulated himself in a clathrin-coated vesicle to be transported across a membrane into Level 3.

 

Naveen Devasagayam named finalist in SSHRC Storytellers competition

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Congratulations to BMC student Naveen Devasagayam who has been selected as one of 25 finalists in the SSHRC National Storytellers competition for his animated entry highlighting research in BMC’s Science Visualization Lab. This annual contest challenges postsecondary students to show Canadians how social sciences and humanities research is affecting our lives, our world and our future for the better. Naveen has been invited to present at the 2015 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Ottawa and will receive a cash award of $3000. ‪#‎SSHRCStorytellers‬

Visualizing Biological Data from Naveen Devasagayam on Vimeo.

Faces of U of T Medicine profiles Vijay Shahani

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“Vijay Shahani knows just how confusing chemistry can be. To help budding scientific minds better understand complicated concepts, he has developed Chemversity, a computer program meant to help students and educators alike. “

Faces of U of T Medicine is a series that profiles Faculty of Medicine students with unique stories to tell. Their profile of Vijay Shahani’s Masters Research Project, is featured at: http://medicine.utoronto.ca/…/faces-u-t-medicine-vijay-shah…

Two new publications

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The ScienceVis group has two new publications. The first is a report by Andrea Gauthier and Michael Corrin on their study exploring video game design elements and usage patterns in undergraduate anatomy. The second is a pilot study by Jodie Jenkinson and Gaël McGill examining the effects of visual complexity in 3D molecular animation.

Both can be downloaded here:
Gauthier, A., & Corrin, M. (2013). Exploring How the Incorporation of Video Game Design Elements Into An Online Thoracic Vasculature Study Aid Affects Use Patterns of Undergraduate Anatomy Students. Journal of Biocommunication, 39(2), 50–56. (PDF)
Jenkinson, J., & McGill, G. (2013). Using 3D Animation in Biology Education : Examining the Effects of Visual Complexity in the Representation of Dynamic Molecular Events. Journal of Biocommunication, 39(2), 42–49. (PDF)